If you are survivor of abuse at a State or faith-based institution and you want to share your story with us, please get in touch. You can call us confidentially on 0800 222 727 or register online

If you have whānau who suffered abuse at a State or faith-based care institution, your account is very important to this investigation.

These accounts, combined with those of many other victims and survivors of abuse in the care, are helping the Royal Commission to make findings about what happened and why, and any appropriate recommendations for change.

If you have information you want to share about abuse at a State or faith-based care institution, then please call us confidentially on 0800 222 727 or register online.

From 13-17 June, survivors who experienced abuse and neglect in foster care will share their experiences and evidence at a public hearing.

When the State intervened, many children spent time in foster care, after being taken from their family or whānau, hapū and iwi, and it is necessary to look deeply into the causes and effects of abuse in foster care environments. Foster care is also a contemporary issue, and with what we learn from this hearing we can influence change to protect children in care now and in the future. 

Survivors will share evidence about the physical, sexual, emotional or psychological and cultural abuse they experienced in foster care and what impact this has had on them and their whānau.

Experts who can speak to attachment, disconnection, trauma, Te Ao Māori, child welfare and social welfare practise will also give insights into the kaupapa being addressed by the hearing.  

From Monday till Thursday we will hear from Māori, Pacific people and Pākehā survivors who include survivors from the disability community and the rainbow community.  On Friday the final day, panels of survivors and other expert witnesses, will discuss the current State care system and provide advice on what can be improved.

The hearing will explore themes such as: 

  • the impact of abuse and multiple placements had on a survivor, including the survivor's ability to form and maintain secure relationships post their time in care
  • the impact of being removed or separated from whānau, culture and whakapapa
  • the survivor’s account of not being seen, heard, supported and cared for while they were in foster care, how children were disbelieved and discouraged from making complaints about their treatment.

Under the current COVID-19 settings it is safe for this hearing will be open to the public.  We warmly welcome survivors and members of the public to attend in person or to watch the hearing live stream. 

The hearing will take place at Tii Tu Tahi, Level 2, 414 Khyber Pass Road (entrance is on Kingdon Street).

From 13 June the hearing will be livestreamed from this page.
 
If you are having trouble accessing the livestream you can contact us on 0800 222 727. 
 
After each witness has finished their evidence we will upload a video of their evidence to our website.  

We will also upload the witness' written statement as well as a transcript of everything that was said by the witness, counsel and the commissioners while the witness gave evidence.  

Sometimes they may be delays in getting these videos and documents on to the website but we strive to get these published quickly. 
 
If you need a hard copy of a transcript or statement, let us know and we will send this to you.  

Sometimes it might take up to a few weeks after the hearing ends for these to be available. 
 
Please call the Contact Centre on 0800 222 727 if you need help with these documents or videos. 

We are investigating and abuse in State-based foster and family-home placements in Aotearoa New Zealand between 1950 and 1999.

The voices and experiences of victims and survivors of abuse in foster care are at the centre of this inquiry as we investigate and make findings on what happened and why.

When the State intervened, foster care was where many children were placed, after being taken from their whānau, hapū and iwi. Because most survivors we have heard from spent time in foster care, it is necessary to look deeply into the causes and effects of abuse in foster care environments.

Foster care is also a challenging contemporary issue, and with what we learn from this inquiry we can influence change to protect children in care now and in the future.

The Foster Care investigation is part of the social welfare inquiry which includes investigations into abuse in youth justice care and State children’s residential homes.

Survivors’ evidence will inform the social welfare report which will include findings and recommendations based on our investigations through public hearings, survivor and witness accounts, research and policy review, hui, wānanga and fono.

We will make recommendations on steps the State should take to address the harm caused, and changes to be made so that the factors that allowed abuse to occur in foster care do not persist in the future. 

The inquiry will investigate the abuse of children in foster care via an examination of care experiences in foster care and family homes.
Filetype(s): Word DocumentCreated May 2022
Procedural